As of May 2013, we are offering limited breeding service and selling off most of our herd does.

 

BLUE BEAR FARM

THIS IS THE LAST SHOW FOR US. WE FEEL WE HAVE MADE A GREAT IMPACT ON OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH 4-H AND THE GOATS. THE PICTURE SHOWS MOST OF THE BLUE BEAR GIRLS THAT PARTICIPATED IN THE JUNE 2014 MONROE ADGA SHOW. THANKS FOR THE BEAUTIFUL MEMORIES. IT IS WITH EXCITEMENT AND TEARS THAT WE SAY GOODBYE!

 

The goats from left to right: Brigette, Posey, Willow, Deshka, Hershey, Sangria,Truffles, Arioso, Delight and Belle.

 

 2010, 2011 & 2012 EVERGREEN STATE FAIR ADGA PREMIER BREEDER, PREMIER EXHIBITOR, AND BEST UDDER

 2012 CLARK COUNTY FAIR ADGA PREMIER EXHIBITOR, BEST UDDER AND BEST DOE IN SHOW

 2012 SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON FAIR ADGA PREMIER BREEDER, PREMIER EXHIBITOR AND BEST UDDER

2012 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR (PUYALLUP FAIR) ADGA PREMIER BREEDER, PREMIER EXHIBITOR, AND BEST UDDER

2012 CENTRAL WASHINGTON STATE FAIR (YAKIMA) ADGA PREMIER BREEDER, EXHIBITOR, AND BEST UDDER

 

Welcome!  Blue Bear Farm specializes in Nigerian Dwarf dairy goats, the smallest of the dairy goat breeds.  Our little hobby farm is in Snohomish County near Arlington, Washington.  We show in local American Dairy Goat Association (ADGA) shows and our daughter has shown for the past several years in her 4-H group, Does Udder Kids.  Our Nigerian genetics include Sno Valley, Camanna, HBF, Sugar Pine, CTC, Old Mountain Farm, Piddlin' Acres, Promisedland, Goodwood, Twin Creeks, Poppy Patch, Algedi, and Rosasharn.  We are currently members of ADGA, AGS, and NDGA.  Our herd is CAE-tested each year and our goats are CAE negative, Johnnes negative and  CL negative (January, 2013).

 

Our daughter has her own herd, Rodeo Girls, and her goats are included here in our in our website (marked as owned by Rodeo Girls).  In addition to her Nigerian Dwarves, she has had a nice Oberhasli doe.

 

NOTE:  Keep checking back, as we often update information and photos in our website.  We have some adult does for sale and will soon have several new kids (we can't keep them all!).  Please contact us with questions or if you're interested in reserving a doeling, buck, or wether, or buying an adult doe or two.  (We reserve the option to make any buckling a wether at any time, right up to the pickup date, as we deem necessary or appropriate for the health of the animal, the herd, and in the best interests of the breed).

About Us

THE BEGINNING...

We started with one doe, Raven Crest Kimmy, in the summer of 2005 and quickly learned that she needed a companion.  So, we purchased KLC Pepper Ann, and thus began a new lifestyle for us.  We found that we enjoyed these little goats so much that we were spending hours at a time with our goats.  It might seem crazy, but there is something therapeutic about just sitting and talking with goats!

 

RAISING THE KIDS...

We have tried dam and bottle raising our babies and found that bottle raising is the best fit for our farm.  We usually leave the kids with their dams for their first couple of days, then transition them to bottle feeding.  We get to see what each kid's personality is like early on and can manage their diets more precisely during their first year or so of life.  They are very friendly with people, even strangers, such as fair-goers and judges.  Although there are exceptions, the bottle-raised kids also seem to behave a bit better in the show ring.  Dam raising kids who are friendly and later behave well in the ring can certainly be done, but for us, bottle raising has usually worked better.

 

OUR GOALS

We want to raise healthy, show-quality dairy goats that are affordable, mainly for families with children who want to show in 4H, but also for anyone who wants a nice, healthy diary goat for show, milking, or just a fun pet.  We're steadily improving the average quality of our goats through careful breeding and proper culling, hopefully keeping our herd small in numbers, but high in quality.  We also want to be a resource for other folks new to goat keeping and pass on lessons we've learned about caring for these little guys.

 

GIVING THE CREDIT...

We wouldn't have enjoyed raising goats as much without the great help and advice from some other "goat friends," particularly the Just As I Am farm and the Udderly Crazy farm.  There are others, can't list 'em all, but these folks have had a tremendous impact on Blue Bear Farm.

Our Farm

We're making the most use we can of our little farm.  We have four bucks and one wether, Tanner, who we'll never sell...he has quite a survival story, thanks to Becky, and will always have a home here.  We'll be finished showing goats for the year in October, then will get right into breeding for the 2013 season.  We'll dry off the does by December to give them a break for a few months.  Our does and bucks received ADGA Linear Appraisals in 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013 and in August, 2014.  Some of the results are shown with the respective goats in this website and we'll be updating them soon, as well as some updated photos.  You're welcome to contact us for more detailed appraisal information on a particular goat.

 

During kidding season, we often open our farm to families interested in raising their own goats so they can experience the same joy that we do, especially with the babies.  Sometimes, the children get to bottle feed and romp a bit with the goats.  We are in the kidding season now and will gradually be adding to the herd through May 2014, so contact us if you want to buy some beautiful goats!

Want to become a goat keeper?

Normally, our kids must be at least two months old in order to leave the farm.  We usually have kids available in late spring and summer.  We'll sell most of the doelings and all of our wethers every year.  On occasion, we sell some adult does, too.

 

If you are interested in purchasing a goat and don't currently keep goats, we would like to share a few things that you'll need to know and have before bringing them home.  There's plenty other things to know, have on hand, and be prepared for, so these are just the basics:

 

1.  First, make sure you have the time to care for them properly!

2.  You'll need at least two goats.  Goats need a companion (usually another goat, sometimes a horse will work)...after all, they're a herd animal.

3.  Good, dry, clean shelter with clean bedding, such as straw or wood chips.  If you don't have a barn or similar building, a large dog house will work just fine for a couple of Nigerian Dwarves.  Unlike sheep and some other livestock, goats hide from the rain and wind and need to stay dry, preferably in a draft-free shelter.

4.  Plenty of fresh, clean water (emphasis on clean!).

5.  Quality, clean hay (not just grass or forage alone).

6.  Quality dairy goat grain.

7.  Good fencing!  Goats are curious and the grass is always greener on the other side.  Being goats, they take the high ground, even if it's your car, so having good, secure fencing is a must to keep them in and the predators out.

8.  Make sure your goats have NO ACCESS to poisonous plants (such as rhododendrons).

9.  Identify a good, available goat veterinarian - keep his/her phone number handy and know where they are (you'll be glad you did!).  If you can't find one, at least have someone you can call in a pinch for "goat advice" when you need it.

 

There's plenty more to consider before keeping your own goats, so we recommend doing your research.  Take a look at other goat keepers' websites, read goat-related books, talk to people who keep goats, etc.  It can be a lot of fun, if you're prepared!

Our kitten, Mr. Cuddles (should be called the "other milk bucket")